WILDLIFE ON THE ESTATE

The estate is home to a host of native wildlife including the Eastern Grey kangaroo, Eurasian Coot birds, Plovers, Blue tongue lizards, and the Australian Wood (Maned) duck, among many other special creatures.

Wildlife on the Estate

Short-beaked Australian Echidna Tachyglossus Aculeates

Our echidna family reside in the lower eastern part of the property between the trilogy lakes. The short beak echidna is recognisable by its distinctive spiny coat, short legs and long snout. Ants and termites are at top of the menu for our spiky friends, where with a flick of their long sticky tongue and sharp claws they are able to break into their prey’s nests for a satisfying feast.

The Short-beaked Echidna is a monotreme like the Platypus, meaning it is an egg-laying mammal. After about 10 days, newborns emerge from their egg, blind and hairless, and suckle from their mother for two to three months from inside the mothers pouch. Once they become too prickly for their pouches, the mother Echidna will build a burrow for her young and continue to suckle for a further six months.

Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus Giganteus

Throughout the morning, our kangaroo ‘mobs’ like to hop around in the lower west area of the estate and in the afternoon you will find them basking in the sun amongst the estate’s native gum trees.

The Eastern Grey Kangaroo is identifiable by its light grey coloured woolly fur. They have a slightly darker face and a dark tip on the end of their tail. With their long muscular tail and powerful hind legs, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo will appear to glide across the landscape with every leap and bound.

Although predominantly a grazing animal, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo enjoys a specific diet of their favourite selection of grasses as well as certain plants and even some fungi. Dry grasses may be more difficult for them to digest, preferring young green shoots that are high in protein.

 

Eurasian Coot Fulica atra

You will spot these distinctive water birds gliding effortlessly over trilogy lakes. Their short white beak and red eyes make them instantly recognisable not to mention the distinctive ‘kow-kow-kow’ or ‘kwok’

call they use to attract their mates. Once a pair of Coots decide that they like each other, they will affectionately nibble on one another’s feathers and make greeting postures toward each other.

The preferred diet of the Eurasian Coot consists of leaves, shoots, and stems of plants. They also love to pull up underwater weeds and come onshore in large groups to nibble at grasses or leaves.

Australian Wood (Maned) Duck Chenonetta jubata

Trilogy lakes are also home to the Australian Wood (Maned) Duck. The lake habitat on Wooling Hill is ideal for this species as they commonly prefer to congregate around grasslands, open woodlands, flooded pastures and spaces along the coast in inlets and bays.

You can spot the Australian Wood Duck by its ‘goose-like’ body, dark brown head, and pale grey body with two black stripes along the back.

Females are distinguished from males by their paler head with two white stripes above and below the eye, whereas males have a darker head and small dark mane, with a speckled brown-grey breast and a black lower belly undertail.

Grasses, clover, herbs and the occasional insect are the preferred meal for the Australian Wood Duck.

 

Australian White Ibis (Sacred Ibis) Threskiornis molucca (T. aethiopica)

This highly recognisable Australian bird graces the landscape of Wooling Hill with its almost entirely white body plumage, and featherless black head and neck. During the breeding season the small patch of skin on the under-surface of the wing changes from a dull pink colour to dark scarlet.

During courtship, the male Australian White Ibis will put on a noisy display from atop of a tall tree branch as well as showing aggression toward other males. When the female arrives, he offers her a twig, forging a bond when she grasps it and they begin to preen one another.

Terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates as well as human food scraps make up the Australian Ibis’s diet.

Short-beaked Australian Echidna Tachyglossus Aculeates

Our echidna family reside in the lower eastern part of the property between the trilogy lakes. The short beak echidna is recognisable by its distinctive spiny coat, short legs and long snout. Ants and termites are at top of the menu for our spiky friends, where with a flick of their long sticky tongue and sharp claws they are able to break into their prey’s nests for a satisfying feast.

The Short-beaked Echidna is a monotreme like the Platypus, meaning it is an egg-laying mammal. After about 10 days, newborns emerge from their egg, blind and hairless, and suckle from their mother for two to three months from inside the mothers pouch. Once they become too prickly for their pouches, the mother Echidna will build a burrow for her young and continue to suckle for a further six months.

Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus Giganteus

Throughout the morning, our kangaroo ‘mobs’ like to hop around in the lower west area of the estate and in the afternoon you will find them basking in the sun amongst the estate’s native gum trees.

The Eastern Grey Kangaroo is identifiable by its light grey coloured woolly fur. They have a slightly darker face and a dark tip on the end of their tail. With their long muscular tail and powerful hind legs, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo will appear to glide across the landscape with every leap and bound.

Although predominantly a grazing animal, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo enjoys a specific diet of their favourite selection of grasses as well as certain plants and even some fungi. Dry grasses may be more difficult for them to digest, preferring young green shoots that are high in protein.

FOLLOW US

ENQUIRIES